Former Foster Child opens his child welfare file

Posted by ryanjackson on Mar 30, 2015 in photos, video

Former Foster Child opens his child welfare file from Ryan Jackson on Vimeo.

Former foster child Kane Blacque obtained his Alberta child welfare file recently through a freedom of information request. March 30, 2015. Video by Ryan Jackson, Edmonton Journal.

This video posed an interesting challenge. Kane Blacque had lived a very tragic life and had the courage to FOIP his child welfare file and share it with Edmonton Journal columnist Paula Simons.

Creating a video to go with Paula’s column posed an interesting challenge as all I had to work with was the interview with Kane and visuals of him reading his welfare file. We had to be very careful what we showed in his file for legal and privacy reasons.

I wanted to create a video that had a serious feeling to go with the very serious topic. I shot the interview with two Panasonic GH4’s and used a Kessler Pocket Dolly and Pocket Jib to move the camera. I used macro extension tubes with a Canon 50mm f1.2L lens to get closeups of the documents.

Here is Paula Simons helping me test the lighting.

Here is Paula Simons helping me test the lighting. I used two lights to the left and right and one above on a boom arm.

Behind the scenes photo of Kane reading his child welfare file. I used cinefoil (black tinfoil) to control the light from my LEDgo light panels.

Behind the scenes photo of Kane reading his child welfare file. I used cinefoil (black tinfoil) to control the light from my LEDgo light panels.

Kane Blacque poses for a photo in the Citadel Theatre in Edmonton on March 30, 2015. When he was young he would spend hours in this spot by himself and think about his life which was spent working as teen prostitute in the 1990's. Last August, Blacque filed a Freedom of Information request with Alberta Human Services to see his entire child welfare record. Photo by Ryan Jackson / Edmonton Journal

Kane Blacque poses for a photo in the Citadel Theatre in Edmonton on March 30, 2015. When he was young he would spend hours in this spot by himself and think about his life which was spent working as teen prostitute in the 1990’s. Last August, Blacque filed a Freedom of Information request with Alberta Human Services to see his entire child welfare record. Photo by Ryan Jackson / Edmonton Journal

 

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Operation Varsity Paratrooper training

Posted by ryanjackson on Mar 19, 2015 in photos, video

Operation Varsity Paratrooper training from Ryan Jackson on Vimeo.

Soldiers from the 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry conducted training exercises around Josephburg, Alta. on March 19, 2015. The purpose of the training was to practice airborne skills in the seizure and securing of an airfield objective as well as commemorate the 70th anniversary of Operation VARSITY, a successful allied WWII airborne operation in 1945. The soldiers even jumped from a historic DC-3 Dakota airplane that was used in the original operation 70 years ago. Video by Ryan Jackson, Edmonton Journal

Soldiers from the 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry conducted training exercises around Josephburg, Alta. on March 19, 2015. The purpose of the training was to practice airborne skills in the seizure and securing of an airfield objective as well as commemorate the 70th anniversary of Operation VARSITY, a successful allied WWII airborne operation in 1945. The soldiers even jumped from a historic DC-3 Dakota airplane that was used in the original operation 70 years ago. Video by Ryan Jackson, Edmonton Journal

Soldiers from the 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry conducted training exercises around Josephburg, Alta. on March 19, 2015.  Photo by Ryan Jackson, Edmonton Journal

Soldiers from the 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry conducted training exercises around Josephburg, Alta. on March 19, 2015. The purpose of the training was to practice airborne skills in the seizure and securing of an airfield objective as well as commemorate the 70th anniversary of Operation VARSITY, a successful allied WWII airborne operation in 1945. The soldiers even jumped from a historic DC-3 Dakota airplane that was used in the original operation 70 years ago. Video by Ryan Jackson, Edmonton Journal

Soldiers from the 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry conducted training exercises around Josephburg, Alta. on March 19, 2015. Photo by Ryan Jackson, Edmonton Journal

Members of the Scotford Hutterite Colony check out the historic DC-3 Dakota used for Operation Varsity at Josephburg airort on March 19, 2015. Photo by Ryan Jackson / Edmonton Journal

Members of the Scotford Hutterite Colony check out the historic DC-3 Dakota used for Operation Varsity at Josephburg airport on March 19, 2015. Photo by Ryan Jackson / Edmonton Journal

 

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Cow Cop hanging up his spurs

Posted by ryanjackson on Mar 6, 2015 in video

Cow Cop hanging up his spurs from Ryan Jackson on Vimeo.

RCMP livestock investigator Cpl. David Heaslip is retiring after 45 years, making him the longest serving member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. March 6, 2015. Video by Ryan Jackson, Edmonton Journal

 —
Journal reporter Jana Pruden and I got to spend a day with Royal Canadian Mounted Police Cpl. David Heaslip who was retiring in a few days.
Basically his job was to investigate all issues around livestock in northern Alberta such as cattle theft and fraud.  He was the perfect man for the job. We felt like we were hanging out with a modern cowboy. Aside from the cool job he was also the longest serving member of the RCMP after more than 45 years.
This was a great story but unfortunately we didn’t find out about Heaslip until it was his last week on the job.  There was only one afternoon that would work for us to follow him so the pressure was on.
Here's Cpl. David Heaslip being interviewed by Jana Pruden in the A&W restaurant in Westlock, Alberta on March 6, 2015. It was filled with old farmers having morning coffee.

Here’s Cpl. David Heaslip being interviewed by Jana Pruden in the A&W restaurant in Westlock, Alberta on March 6, 2015. It was filled with old farmers having morning coffee.

For this story I decided to use my Canon XF300 video camera. I usually avoid using traditional “video cameras” as I prefer the quality of DSLR video over the small 1/3” sensor of the XF300.
For this story though, I only had once chance to capture him I knew I would have to keep the camera running the whole time to catch any great moments or sound bites. Normal video cameras are great for that because they have image stabilized zoom lenses, autofocus and way better ergonomics than a DSLR.
I still wanted to have as much of a cinematic look as possible so to combat the “video look” of the XF300 so I setup the camera with a very flat, low contrast, cine colour profile and planned on grading the footage afterwards to get the look I wanted.
The biggest exposure consideration when filming anything is to preserve your highlights. Blown out highlights (over exposed whites) are the quickest way to make you videos look amateur.
This is a lot of the reason why people who shot on film for years hated digital cameras. Digital sensors could’t handle highlights as well which would affect skin tones, colour and the overall look of the finished product.
Film cameras and higher-end digital cinema cameras can handle highlights far better than small video cameras and DSLRs. If you know what you are doing you can fake it with a digital camera, but you have to be very careful with your exposure.
Back to the XF300. I wanted this video story to have a 2.35:1 aspect ratio similar to many Hollywood movies.
This was simply a personal choice. Some people hate the super wide format. Everyone is different.
I set my viewfinder to have a 2.35:1 mask (white bars that help you frame your subject) so that I would compose my images for the narrow widescreen format.
The “proper” way to shoot super widescreen format is actually to use an anamorphic lens which actually captures a narrower wide angle field of view and delivers a completely different look than just cropping the image.
These lenses were originally made for tanks to that soldiers could see more terrain when looking through a periscope. They were later used by Hollywood so that movie theatres could offer movies that had a completely different look than the squarish 4:3 programs on TV.
Since I don’t have an anamorphic lens I just cropped my video from 16:9 to 2.35:1 in Final Cut Pro X.  It is really important that you mask your viewfinder when you want to shoot in 2.35:1 aspect ratio or you will cut things out of your frame that you want.  If your camera doesn’t allow you to add bars then putting tape over the LCD screen helps too.
Here is a picture of the viewfinder on my XF300. Notice the horizontal white bars to help frame the image 2.35:1. I also have a piece of tape reminding me that I’m composing 2.25:1 and to keep my highlights below 90%.

Here is a picture of the viewfinder on my XF300. Notice the horizontal white bars to help frame the image 2.35:1. I also have a piece of tape reminding me that I’m composing 2.25:1 and to keep my highlights below 90%.

I wish we could have spent more time with Heaslip but news reporting is all about doing the best you can with the time you have.
When I got back to the office I edited the video in Final Cut Pro X and used the great plugin FilmConvert to grade (colour) the video in black and white.
Check out the finished video at the top of this post.

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Mayerthorpe massacre 10 year anniversary

Posted by ryanjackson on Mar 3, 2015 in photos, video

Mayerthorpe massacre 10 year anniversary from Ryan Jackson on Vimeo.

The Mayerthorpe Fallen Four Memorial Society held a candle lighting ceremony in Mayerthorpe, Alta. on March 3, 2015 to commemorate the 10 year anniversary of the deaths of RCMP Constables Peter Schiemann, Leo Johnston, Anthony Gordon and Brock Myrol in what was the worst multiple killing of Mounties in modern Canadian history. Video by Ryan Jackson / Edmonton Journal

The Mayerthorpe Fallen Four Memorial Society held a candle lighting ceremony in Mayerthorpe, Alta. on March 3, 2015 to commemorate the 10 year anniversary of the deaths of RCMP Constables Peter Schiemann, Leo Johnston, Anthony Gordon and Brock Myrol in what was the worst multiple killing of Mounties in modern Canadian history. (Photo by Ryan Jackson / Edmonton Journal)

The Mayerthorpe Fallen Four Memorial Society held a candle lighting ceremony in Mayerthorpe, Alta. on March 3, 2015 to commemorate the 10 year anniversary of the deaths of RCMP Constables Peter Schiemann, Leo Johnston, Anthony Gordon and Brock Myrol in what was the worst multiple killing of Mounties in modern Canadian history. (Photo by Ryan Jackson / Edmonton Journal)

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Driving the Winter Ice Road to Fort Chipewyan

Posted by ryanjackson on Feb 4, 2015 in photos, video

Winter Ice Road to Fort Chipewyan from Ryan Jackson on Vimeo.

Take a ride up the winter ice road from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan in Northern Alberta. The 200-km temporary road typically opens mid-December and closes mid-March, depending on the weather. During that short window of time all the construction materials, heating oil, gasoline and diesel fuel for the year is shipped up to the isolated community of Fort Chipewyan which can only be accessed by air or river barge in the summer. Video by Ryan Jackson, Edmonton Journal

I got to go on a little adventure to my favourite place in Alberta. Journal reporter (and now Globe and Mail reporter) Marty Klinkenberg and I got approval to head up north to Fort McMurray and Fort Chipewyan for five days to cover various stories. The best story is of the doctor up in Fort Chipewyan which I will be writing about in a future blog post. The coolest part (pardon the pun) was that we were going to drive the temporary winter ice road from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan, Alberta’s most isolated aboriginal community. Fort Chipewyan is only accessible in the summer by air or boat via the Athabasca river. There is no way to drive to Fort Chipewyan except for a few weeks in the winter when an ice road can be made.

 

We were going for five days so I had to pack relatively light for the trip. I new it was going to be cold which means everything would slow down so the less gear the better. I was able to fit all my camera gear and clothing and supplies in two Thinktank Logistics Manager suitcases. I love these cases because they are tall enough to fit tripods and light stands so that you can literally have everything on wheels. I brought two Panasonic GH4 cameras for shooting video and a Canon 1DX for stills. I also squeezed in a Kessler Pocket Dolly and a Slik tripod and head for support.

We were going for five days so I had to pack relatively light for the trip. I new it was going to be cold which meant everything would slow down so the less gear the better. I was able to fit all my camera gear and clothing and supplies in two Thinktank Logistics Manager suitcases. I love these cases because they are tall enough to fit tripods and light stands so that you can literally have everything on wheels. I brought two Panasonic GH4 cameras for shooting video and a Canon 1DX for stills. I also squeezed in a Kessler Pocket Dolly and a Slik tripod and head for support.

We interviewed the Mayor of Fort McMurray and other local business owners about the economy and looming recession. The price of oil hadnÕt plunged anywhere near to where it would be a year later. I bet if we re-asked all the same questions today we would be getting very different answers.

We interviewed the Mayor of Fort McMurray and other local business owners about the economy and looming recession. The price of oil hadn’t plunged anywhere near to where it would be a year later. I bet if we re-asked all the same questions today we would be getting very different answers.

Here's a photo of me shooting some video on the hood of our rental SUV. The Panasonic GH4's handled the cold surprisingly well. I only had one incident where the camera literally froze up and the buttons stopped working. On the bright side it kept recording video and I didn't miss anything.

Here’s a photo of me shooting some video on the hood of our rental SUV. The Panasonic GH4’s handled the cold surprisingly well. I only had one incident where the camera literally froze up and the buttons stopped working. On the bright side it kept recording video and I didn’t miss anything.

 

It was incredibly cold that week but that was a good thing. We had a mild winter so far and the ice road had only recently been open to the public. Simply put, without cold weather and ice, there is no road. With warmer winters lately, the ice road is open fewer days each year which closes the window of opportunity to ship fuel, building supplies and cheaper groceries up to Fort Chipewyan.

It was incredibly cold that week but that was a good thing. We had a mild winter so far and the ice road had only recently been open to the public. Simply put, without cold weather and ice, there is no road. With warmer winters lately, the ice road is open fewer days each year which closes the window of opportunity to ship fuel, building supplies and cheaper groceries up to Fort Chipewyan.

Loading up on supplies. We bought all our groceries and got an extra snow shovel for our rental vehicle.

Loading up on supplies. We bought all our groceries and got an extra snow shovel for our rental vehicle.

The gate to the Fort Chipewyan winter ice road.

The gate to the Fort Chipewyan winter ice road.

he winter ice road from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan in Northern Alberta on on February 4, 2015. The 200-km temporary road typically opens mid-December and closes mid-March depending on the weather. During that short window of time all the construction materials, heating oil, gasoline and diesel fuel for the year is shipped up to the isolated community of Fort Chipewyan which can only be accessed by air or river barge in the summer. Photo by Ryan Jackson / Edmonton Journal

The winter ice road from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan in Northern Alberta on on February 4, 2015. The 200-km temporary road typically opens mid-December and closes mid-March depending on the weather. During that short window of time all the construction materials, heating oil, gasoline and diesel fuel for the year is shipped up to the isolated community of Fort Chipewyan which can only be accessed by air or river barge in the summer. Photo by Ryan Jackson / Edmonton Journal

he winter ice road from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan in Northern Alberta on on February 4, 2015. The 200-km temporary road typically opens mid-December and closes mid-March depending on the weather. During that short window of time all the construction materials, heating oil, gasoline and diesel fuel for the year is shipped up to the isolated community of Fort Chipewyan which can only be accessed by air or river barge in the summer. Photo by Ryan Jackson / Edmonton Journal

The winter ice road from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan in Northern Alberta on on February 4, 2015. The 200-km temporary road typically opens mid-December and closes mid-March depending on the weather. During that short window of time all the construction materials, heating oil, gasoline and diesel fuel for the year is shipped up to the isolated community of Fort Chipewyan which can only be accessed by air or river barge in the summer. Photo by Ryan Jackson / Edmonton Journal

A construction worker sprays water to build up ice thickness on the Firebag River along the winter ice road from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan in Northern Alberta on on February 4, 2015. The 200-km temporary road typically opens mid-December and closes mid-March depending on the weather. During that short window of time all the construction materials, heating oil, gasoline and diesel fuel for the year is shipped up to the isolated community of Fort Chipewyan which can only be accessed by air or river barge in the summer. Photo by Ryan Jackson / Edmonton Journal

A construction worker sprays water to build up ice thickness on the Firebag River along the winter ice road from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan in Northern Alberta on on February 4, 2015. The 200-km temporary road typically opens mid-December and closes mid-March depending on the weather. During that short window of time all the construction materials, heating oil, gasoline and diesel fuel for the year is shipped up to the isolated community of Fort Chipewyan which can only be accessed by air or river barge in the summer. Photo by Ryan Jackson / Edmonton Journal

This was the weirdest thing we saw on the ice road. This tree was literally in the middle of nowhere. A random tree is decorated in Christmas ornaments along the winter ice road from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan in Northern Alberta on on February 4, 2015.

This was the weirdest thing we saw on the ice road. This tree was literally in the middle of nowhere. A random tree is decorated in Christmas ornaments along the winter ice road from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan in Northern Alberta on on February 4, 2015.

Cracks in the ice over the Slave River crossing along the winter ice road from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan in Northern Alberta on on February 6, 2015. The 200-km temporary road typically opens mid-December and closes mid-March depending on the weather. During that short window of time all the construction materials, heating oil, gasoline and diesel fuel for the year is shipped up to the isolated community of Fort Chipewyan which can only be accessed by air or river barge in the summer. Photo by Ryan Jackson / Edmonton Journal

Cracks in the ice over the Slave River crossing along the winter ice road from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan in Northern Alberta on on February 6, 2015. The 200-km temporary road typically opens mid-December and closes mid-March depending on the weather. During that short window of time all the construction materials, heating oil, gasoline and diesel fuel for the year is shipped up to the isolated community of Fort Chipewyan which can only be accessed by air or river barge in the summer. Photo by Ryan Jackson / Edmonton Journal

A grouse on the side of the ice road between Fort Chipewyan and Fort Smith. The winter ice road from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan in Northern Alberta on on February 6, 2015.

A grouse on the side of the ice road between Fort Chipewyan and Fort Smith. The winter ice road from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan in Northern Alberta on on February 6, 2015.

Journal reporter Marty Klinkenberg poses for a photo at one of the river crossings along the winter ice road from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan in Northern Alberta on on February 4, 2015.

Journal reporter Marty Klinkenberg poses for a photo at one of the river crossings along the winter ice road from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan in Northern Alberta on on February 4, 2015.

Journal reporter Marty Klinkenberg, left, and photographer Ryan Jackson try to push Isaias Morgan’s vehicle after he got stuck in a snow bank after losing control along the winter ice road from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan.

Journal reporter Marty Klinkenberg, left, and photographer Ryan Jackson try to push Isaias Morgan’s vehicle after he got stuck in a snow bank after losing control along the winter ice road from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan.

Journal photographer Ryan Jackson, left, and reporter Marty Klinkenberg try to add weight to the back of Isaias Morgan’s vehicle after he got stuck in a snow bank after losing control along the winter ice road from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan.

Journal photographer Ryan Jackson, left, and reporter Marty Klinkenberg try to add weight to the back of Isaias Morgan’s vehicle after he got stuck in a snow bank after losing control along the winter ice road from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan.

Journal reporter Marty Klinkenberg stands by as Ice Road Trucker Ed Sullivan pulls Isaias MorganÕs vehicle out after he got stuck in a snow bank after losing control along the winter ice road from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan.

Journal reporter Marty Klinkenberg stands by as Ice Road Trucker Ed Sullivan pulls Isaias Morgan’s vehicle out after he got stuck in a snow bank after losing control along the winter ice road from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan.

We made it to Fort Chipewyan!

We made it to Fort Chipewyan!

You don't see buffalo crossing signs every day.

You don’t see buffalo crossing signs every day.

The worst! On our drive back from Fort Chipewyan had an incidentÉ. Marty drove the way up to Fort Chip and I drove back. It was my birthday that day and my wife and I were headed to Phoenix the next day for a nice warm vacation. I was so excited and happy to drive the ice road that I didnÕt notice when I missed the VERY IMPORTANT turn to head SOUTH to Fort McMurray and instead drove North for TWO HOURS before seeing this faded sign that said we were only 119 kms from Fort Smith, NWT. We were in disbelief for a moment. We thought we were almost back to Fort McMurray and here we are two hours north in the wrong direction! Lesson learned. Even in 2015, a compass can come in very handy.

This was the worst!
On our drive back from Fort Chipewyan we had an incident. Marty drove the way up to Fort Chip and I drove back. It was my birthday that day and my wife and I were headed to Phoenix the next day for a nice warm vacation.
I was so excited and happy to drive the ice road that I didn’t notice when I missed the VERY IMPORTANT turn to head SOUTH to Fort McMurray. Instead we drove North for TWO HOURS before seeing this faded sign that said we were only 119 kms from Fort Smith, NWT.
We were in disbelief for a moment. We thought we were almost back to Fort McMurray and here we are two hours north in the wrong direction!
Lesson learned. Even in 2015, a compass can come in very handy.

This experience reminded me of a great TED talk about being Wrong. Kathryn Schulz points out the important difference between being wrong and knowing that you are wrong. I spent two hours driving the wrong direction thinking I was going the right way. I ignored all the subtle sign that would have indicated I was going the wrong way (the sun, the different terrain, the lack of traffic) but I ignored them because I was certain I was going the right way.

Front page of the Edmonton Journal on Feb. 28, 2015.

Front page of the Edmonton Journal on Feb. 28, 2015.

Double truck story by Marty Klinkenberg in the Edmonton Journal on Feb. 28, 2015.

Double truck story by Marty Klinkenberg in the Edmonton Journal on Feb. 28, 2015.

Double truck story by Marty Klinkenberg in the Edmonton Journal on Feb. 28, 2015.

Finally, here is the fun video I made about the Ice Road. I put a GoPro on the front of our vehicle and recorded the entire drive and then sped it up 800% for the video.  We also interviewed an Ice Road Trucker and a Fort Chipewyan resident who have driven the road for years and offered great tips.

You can also read Marty’s story about the Ice Road here and Alex Zabjek interviewed me and wrote a nice little feature about the making of the video.

Winter Ice Road to Fort Chipewyan from Ryan Jackson on Vimeo.

Take a ride up the winter ice road from Fort McMurray to Fort Chipewyan in Northern Alberta. The 200-km temporary road typically opens mid-December and closes mid-March, depending on the weather. During that short window of time all the construction materials, heating oil, gasoline and diesel fuel for the year is shipped up to the isolated community of Fort Chipewyan which can only be accessed by air or river barge in the summer. Video by Ryan Jackson, Edmonton Journal

My next post will be about the main reason we were up in Fort Chipewyan and what is probably the most important video I’ve ever made.

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Looking for a fight: Boxer Jelena Mrdjenovich

Posted by ryanjackson on Jan 28, 2015 in video

One of my favorite videos of 2015! Thanks to Topher Sequin for helping light this video.
Shot mostly with a Panasonic GH4 and a Canon 24mm f1.4L lens. The lighting at the gym was very dark and muddy so I had Topher shine a 300w halogen spot light at her and I exposed for highlights.
I then graded the footage in Final Cut Pro X and added some film grain to get the gritty look that I wanted.

Looking for a fight: Boxer Jelena Mrdjenovich from Ryan Jackson on Vimeo.

Edmonton boxer Jelena Mrdjenovich is so good she can’t find anyone to fight. Jan 28, 2015. Video by Ryan Jackson / Edmonton Journal

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Ghost LRT station in Edmonton

Posted by ryanjackson on Jan 21, 2015 in video

Ghost LRT station in Edmonton: Future Station from Ryan Jackson on Vimeo.

Take a tour of a hidden LRT station that was built in the 1970s but never used, and is the inspiration for Future Station, the 2015 Alberta Biennial of Contemporary Art in Edmonton. Video by Ryan Jackson, edmontonjournal.com

Shot with a Panasonic GH4 with a 12-35mm lens, a 7.5mm fisheye and a shoulder mount. Small LitePanels LED and Canon tungsten video lighs were used for illumination.

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Roxy Theatre Fire

Posted by ryanjackson on Jan 14, 2015 in photos, video
Bradley Moss, Artistic Director of Theatre Network rummages through the rubble of The Roxy Theatre which burned down on Tuesday in Edmonton on January 14, 2015. (Photo by Ryan Jackson / Edmonton Journal)

Bradley Moss, Artistic Director of Theatre Network rummages through the rubble of The Roxy Theatre which burned down on Tuesday in Edmonton on January 14, 2015. (Photo by Ryan Jackson / Edmonton Journal)

 

Roxy Theatre fire aftermath from Ryan Jackson on Vimeo.

Bradley Moss, Artistic Director of Theatre Network rummages through the rubble of The Roxy Theatre which burned down on Tuesday in Edmonton on January 14, 2015. Video by Ryan Jackson / Edmonton Journal

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BioWare and creating the world of Dragon Age in Edmonton

Posted by ryanjackson on Dec 11, 2014 in video

BioWare is a great Edmonton success story. The video game company started in 1995 and have created some of the highest rated games of all time. I remember spending countless hours playing Shattered Steel back when I was a kid and now I’m addicted to the Mass Effect series.

Journal columnist Paula Simons and I got a tour of BioWare after they won Game of the Year for Dragon Age: Inquisition.

BioWare and creating the world of Dragon Age in Edmonton from Ryan Jackson on Vimeo.

Take a sneak peak inside BioWare and learn about the immense storyworld of Dragon Age that is enjoyed by millions and is created here in Edmonton. Video by Ryan Jackson, edmontonjournal.com

Read the story here.

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How to power through the Butterdome craft fair in 90 minutes

Posted by ryanjackson on Dec 5, 2014 in video

If you are an organized and efficient person then you will love Kathy Kerr’s determination to do all her Christmas shopping in a mere 90 minutes. This was a fun video to make. I just used a Panasonic GH4 with a 12-35mm lens and a shoulder mount so I could stay small and weave through the crowds.

How to power through your Christmas shopping from Ryan Jackson on Vimeo.

With focus and strategy, Kathy Kerr gives tips for how to get in and out of the Butterdome craft fair in 90 minutes with all your Christmas presents. Video by Ryan Jackson, edmontonjournal.com

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